Why being imperfect is a good thing

Voltaire, the extraordinary French writer, once claimed: “Perfect is the enemy of good”. Strange, huh?

I agree with him. When I reflect on my life so far, I notice how perfection has never been as interesting as imperfection. My flaws, rough edges, weaknesses, on the other hand, have been… memorable.

I used to think that I could change the entire world if I wanted to, let alone people and their feelings towards me. I wanted to be the best at everything and at every time. For me, 2 + 2 always had to equal 4. I lived my life like a rule book, and anything that went another way would frustrate me to the core. However, overtime I realised that I, nor the world, can ever be perfect. Sometimes others let us down, sometimes we let others down. And that is okay. That is perfectly normal. Leaving the idea of perfection behind makes us adaptable to live in this world which is often as unfair to us as it is fair.

Imperfections also make us accept our human frailty. When I was writing my book during the 2020 pandemic, I found it incredibly freeing to tell myself at the end of a chapter, “This is fine. I think I’m done with that part.” Once we realise that perfection is a destination where we’ll never truly arrive, we begin to accept that our work will never be a 100%, and we learn to find peace with the best we can do.

High standards are fine, but unrealistically high standards make us miserable. You, like me, may therefore find that the motto, “Aim for excellence, not perfection,” can remind us to do our best without the anxiety and frustration that accompanies a perfectionist mindset. We don’t always have to “deal” with our imperfections, but rather look at them through a different light. At the end of the day, imperfections make life beautiful. So beautiful.

⁃ SaaniaSparkle 🧚🏻‍♀️

123 thoughts on “Why being imperfect is a good thing

  1. I’ve always liked the advice to ‘do your best ‘. Striving for perfection and expecting the same from others leads to a lot of unhappiness. A very relevant and well written post. Thanks Sania.

    Liked by 3 people

      1. No, not really. 😊 Expectations can sometimes spur you on to try harder. But there are different types of expectations and sometimes they can become a burden to oneself and to others because it can lead to a sense of failure or disappointment, if left unfulfilled.

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  2. Je passe te dire Bonjour SANIA
    Il paraît que les personnes les plus chers à notre cœur sont celles à qui nous pensons à notre réveil
    Tu es l’une de ces personnes car tu es ma meilleure amie ou ami
    Belle journée profite au maximum
    Bise avec toute mon amitié
    Bernard

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Imperfection pretty much like vulnerability is strength. Agree with you and sometimes when we set the standard too high we end up doing zilch, leaving alone writing or people. True. we want to change the world but here comes the toughest part to do so. Love this quote of yours: “High standards are fine, but unrealistically high standards make us miserable.”

    Liked by 2 people

  4. This is a very perceptive post, Saania. To do better and not be the best is the key. It took me a long time to realise this. Also, in terms of the “rules,” once I started to move up the ladder at work, I noticed a distinct change. At the bottom, it is black and white. However, on the way to the top, it becomes grey. At the top the world is very grey. This is the conumdrum for all leaders. Maintaining integrity is key as it leads to wise decisions.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. You are very perceptive. Striving for perfection will one day drive one into depression and despair. Striving for excellence though, says we should try our hardest at whatever we do, and it will make us happy that we gave out best effort. Can you imagine everyone being perfect? I sure can’t, but the sense of putting my best towards whatever I was doing, gave me a true sense of accomplishment. I love the defination of “flawsome!”

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi Rev! Thank you for your comment, I absolutely agree. Have you ever felt like we often try to perfect situations that we have no control over, like our relationships and the way people treat us. But in the end, they only lead to frustration when things don’t go according to our expectations?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Certainly have and it usually hurts the relationship. People are people, in order for us to be in a relationship, we must be willing to “let our guard down,” in order to share ourselves with another and they with us. It must be a two-way relationship or it doesn’t work out. Keep up your good writing, you are a “shooting star” in the making. I always look forward to your posts.

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  6. My polio doctor always said as regards me: average is good. He was right as you are. He knew that what lie before me would be challenging enough without such a self – imposed benchmark as perfection. From my vantage point of average I was free enough and so unencumbered that I was inducted into the Connecticut Volleyball Hall of Fame as a high school coach. We all can do our best. Let’s leave perfection to God.
    -Alan

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Dear Alan

      Hello from the UK. Thank you for that. I have some thoughts; Polio is and anagram of ‘I polo’. A polo is a mint with a hole. The heavenly Father wants us to be whole, complete as it were.

      Jesus said ‘In my Father’s house there are many rooms…’ We do not know if the house is a bungalow or not, but I suspect it has to be multi-story. Therefore it has many floors.

      Now a house can be complete, yet with many floors. Which sound like ‘flaws’. So we can be ‘flawed’ ourselves and still completed accepted by the Father because there is plenty of room in His heart for all who come through the door.

      Which is Jesus Christ of course.

      Kind regards

      Baldmichael Theresoluteprotector’sson

      Please excuse the nom-de-plume, this is as much for fun as a riddle for people to solve if they wish.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Baldmichael, thank you so much for your input and insight. As there are floors in a house we all can admit when a visitor is coming we rush to tidy up. So, as it is with us. God is in us and we in Him. And we must we aware of this and the need to keep ourselves tidy as well. As the prodigal son was accepted by his father so too will God accept us. But as the son we must want to come to Him. And come to Him in contriteness for those flaws. I guess this is proof of a purgatory, for none of us passes completely without blemish. And to be with God, who is perfection, so too must we be. Purgatory gives us the time we need to tidy up.
        -Alan

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Your comment is much appreciated, thank you. Purgatory is for this life as we ‘purge’ ourselves of the dross though the washing of the words of Christ via the Holy Spirit that stops us seeing God clearly.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. La perfezione non esiste, è una meta ambita ma quasi mai raggiungibile, perchè siamo umani e l’umano è imperfetto.
    Le mie imperfezioni fisiche le ho sempre accettate, quelle caratteriale ho cercato di migliorarle, non so se ci sono riuscita, ma mi ao così come sono. Anche perchè le imperfezioni possono trasformarsi in fragilità e questo non è proprio un bene, se riusciamo ad amarle culleremo le nostre fragilità rendendole amiche della nostra personalità. Il segno che ci distingue dagli altri.

    Liked by 1 person

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  8. Bonjour Mon AMIE SAANIA

    Combien de fois entendons-nous ce refrain
    Le soleil ne brille pas pour chacun
    Pourtant, il brille pour chacun de nous
    Avec des heures différentes de rendez-vous

    Il ne peut pas, être partout à la fois
    Il a donc bien souvent, à faire des choix
    Si nos jours se ressemblaient tout l’temps
    Les trouverions-nous toujours, aussi amusants

    Le soleil est pour nous un bon compagnon
    Nous devrions apprécier son intervention
    Quand il nous envoie ses amis les nuages
    Le ciel nous donne des jours gris avec la pluie

    Du soleil, on devrait tous s’en faire un ami
    Le comprendre comme avec un ami, un frère un proche ect….
    Belle journée belle semaine
    Que le soleil t’accompagne
    Amitié

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Dear Saania

    An excellent point you make, “Aim for excellence, not perfection,”. Even Jesus says ‘Be complete as you heavenly Father is complete’, although translations seem to generally say perfect which is misleading.

    Having looked in detail at the word in the original Greek I realise I really ought to do a post myself, I have just seen some amazing things.

    So many, many thanks.

    Yours Baldmichael

    Liked by 1 person

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